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91
"If you have had a chance to listen to Currentzis' Tchaikovskii 6, I think you'll gather a good idea of what's in store. Visceral and violent, with very close use of microphones"    .      .     .   

Right you are! I've listened to it carefully on Spotify and your prediction is spot on.
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Yeah, the playing isn't always spotless on these Adam Fischer performers, but the blemishes are always very, very minor.  They do sound 'spontaneous' and 'natural', while lending a sort of 'rustic' quality to Mahler's sound-world. Nothing is slick, artificial or imposed. I may skip the "DLvdE" (which is next), but I'm very curious to know if what they do translates for Mahler 8 (Spring of 2019).  I would that Mahler 6 from this team should be quite interesting.
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You can listen to the Harding M5th, Currentizs M6th, Fischer M3rd, all on Spotify albeit they are in MP3 files. At least you can get some ideas before you make up your mind to buy (or not buy) the CDs or files.

John
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Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Harding's M5 download on sale at eClassical
« Last post by Russell on October 26, 2018, 01:24:09 PM »
Daniel Harding's new M5 is now available for download; the hi-res version (48/24) is currently on sale (about $13) at eClassical for about a week:

http://www.eclassical.com/harmonia-mundi/mahler-symphony-no-5-1.html

Remember that on this site you can sample complete recordings, albeit in 30-second increments. (Just keep hitting the 'play' button.)
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The hi-res download is out now and available via HDtracks (in the US) as well as at other sites that sell Sony downloads:

http://www.hdtracks.com/catalog/product/view/id/698055/s/mahler-symphony-no-6/category/154/
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Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: M3 on C-Avi w/ Adam Fischer/Dusseldorf
« Last post by John Kim on October 26, 2018, 11:27:40 AM »
Here is what I wrote in my online review:

"Adam Fischer's Mahler Third is a revelation, the finest recording of the work I've heard in years! The darkly hued sonority of the Dusseldorf Symphony Orchestra caught my attention right away, and is really what carries this performance. This ensemble is built from bottom to top and fits the Mahler bill perfectly - the golden brass, rich and dark strings, bright but ripened woodwinds, clear and prominent percussion. Fischer's reading is fluent, flexible and warm but also huge in concept and flawless in execution. In this regards and others, he is in the school of 'Grand in scale, minute in details'. The recording sound too is amazing, warm and vibrant with plenty of details.
This one now joins my list of Mt. Everest Mahler 3rds: Bernstein, Horenstein, Levine, Abbado, Zinman, and Fischer."
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Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: M3 on C-Avi w/ Adam Fischer/Dusseldorf
« Last post by John Kim on October 26, 2018, 11:10:27 AM »
BTW is this a live recording?

There is a (small) horn blob around 19'30" of I.

John
98
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: M3 on C-Avi w/ Adam Fischer/Dusseldorf
« Last post by John Kim on October 26, 2018, 10:58:14 AM »
Barry,

You are right! Adam Fischer's M3rd is a revelation, the finest recording of the work I've heard in years! This is a tremendous performance and recording. As you said, the darkly hued orchestral sound is really in its own class and is what carries this performance. Fischer's reading is fluent, flexible and warm but also huge in concept and execution. The recording sound is amazing too.

This one goes to the top of my list of M3rds.

John
99
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: Haitink Mahler 9, June 8, 2018
« Last post by barryguerrero on October 22, 2018, 06:04:44 PM »
"It doesn't look like Jansons will finish his RCO Mahler cycle with M9th"

Good. No great loss there. Maybe RCO Live should just go away, since they've now screwed everything up. We'll never get an official release of the excellent Gatti/RCOA Mahler 3.
100
Yes, and Beethoven didn't understand the violin, and on and on it goes. Standing around backstage with other instrumentalists, there's always complaining about how so and so composer didn't understand their bloody, pathetic instrument (fill in the instrument of your choice). The whole point is that new music challenges everybody, including the listeners.

A trumpet playing friend told me of Mahler's preference for F trumpet based upon his internet exchanges with other know-it-all trumpet players. He could be wrong. It really doesn't matter to me. I just feel that applying the modern, piston valve C trumpet to everything is not really an answer. They may be more secure in the upper end, but I find them lacking in the low end. A prime example of that is the trumpet solo in the third movement of Shostakovich's 8th symphony, which begins down low, then ascends. When Russian players use their Bb's on that solo, it sounds so much fatter. The lowest note should be equally as loud as the upper ones.

"Personally, I would love for every record reviewer who talks about SQ to post a picture of their set-up, and ideally a frequency response chart at their listening position. This, perhaps, sounds extreme, but could be very telling in what the reviewer is actually hearing at his seat. In most instances people aren't getting what truly is represented on the disc. You're getting a huge amount of audio information based on your room and the reflected sound".

What's the point when the same reviewers don't even know what the composer actually wrote? Besides, I don't really agree with the premise. Good sound should sound good on crappy equipment, as well as on expensive equipment. More to the point, there would be ENDLESS arguments as to what constitutes a good sounding stereo system (and what about the rooms themselves!). It would just lead to more elitism and endless debates. I do get your point - I'm just not sure it's truly a solution.
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