Author Topic: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies  (Read 6687 times)

Offline John Kim

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Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« on: October 15, 2010, 06:02:49 AM »
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/product/detail/3928834

Interesting....Maazel's Berlin Eighth (EMI) is a top notch recording, so naturally I am interested ::).

John,

Offline sbugala

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Offline vvrinc

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2011, 09:10:34 PM »
Any ideas on how it sounds?

Glorious! Got mine from the UK ca. a month ago and have been enjoying enormously. Those who are allergic to Maazel may have issues with the set since his predilection for tempi are on the slow side. But then, the orchestra plays for him. Hard to believe that the set was recorded in roughly a month worth of live performances. (What chops!)

Offline John Kim

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2011, 11:35:08 PM »
Glorious! Got mine from the UK ca. a month ago and have been enjoying enormously. Those who are allergic to Maazel may have issues with the set since his predilection for tempi are on the slow side. But then, the orchestra plays for him.
Could you be more specific why you LIKE the performances so much?

John  ;)

Offline vvrinc

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2011, 03:44:50 AM »
John,

I was responding to the word "sound" with my "glorious." I haven't heard them all completely yet (I am up to starting on No. 5) but have sampled all the discs. The performances (of the ones I have listened to completely) have been uniformly world-class level. The band sounds very comfortable with the repertoire and doesn't get perturbed in the moments where Mr. Maazel's tendency to stretch a brass chorale tests lung endurance (the VPO brass, in M3, let out some memorable "arfs" as the members gasped for air in various sections). For me it is neither the greatest (there is no such qualifier in me when it comes to music) I've heard, or the last cycle I will ever buy (I have been remiss with my medication, so I buy them all :D). The sound of the Bavarians in their hall is very special and the performances of the early symphonies rival many of my favorites from other cycles.

Again, in my humble opinion, it doesn't displace the Karajan, various Wands, 2 Jochums, 2 Celibidaches, Skrowaczewski or Chailly cycles from Bruckhalla, but (so far) it has given me great pleasure to discover it. I'll have more blow-by-blows (if anyone would be interested) on each symphony when I am through listening (and re-listening) to all of them. I am most curious as to how the new Eigth will compare with his previous effort: a trully magnificent recording.

Offline John Kim

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2011, 04:43:33 AM »
That's good news.

I've always LOVED the sound of BRSO. I will buy almost any recording played by this orchestra.

But I wish Maazel also recorded a Mahler cycle with BRSO. Actually, he performed the entire cycle with them in the early 2000s. They were all superb.

My fingers are crossed as I wait for your report on the remainder of the cycle.

Thanks for the report.

John,

Offline sbugala

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2011, 03:58:37 PM »
Here's a page that has the timings for the set.  A Ninth with a first movement over 30 mins seems pretty slow. But I've liked the Bruckner I've heard from Maazel in the past.  I suspect his slower tempi would work better for Bruckner. I could hardly stand it in his New York Mahler. 

http://www.abruckner.com/newreleases/featurednewrelease/symphonies09maazel/

Offline John Kim

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2011, 05:36:11 PM »
The timings look pretty good except for the B9: I, as you indicated.

I will surely look forward to the set ;) (the price isn't bad at all).

John,

Offline waderice

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2011, 05:20:20 PM »
This particular Bruckner cycle got an overall positive review in today's (Sunday 27 Feb 11) Washington Post, but the reviewer does have nits to pick.  Read for specifics:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/24/AR2011022408131.html

Wade

Offline barry guerrero

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2011, 06:52:29 AM »
What rhetoric. The reviewer obviously used this opportunity to air-out his preferences in terms of performing versions, and voicing his opinion on whether the earliest symphonies should be included or not  - a total non-issue if there ever was one. To describe the Haas version of B8 as "pasitiche", and to state that it has been largely "discredited", borders on irresponsible journalism. The differences between Haas and Nowak in B8 are not THAT major, and Haas' work certainly hasn't been discredited by anybody of any real significance. What poppy-cock. Personally, I think that any one who has thoroughly listened to both versions of B8 - and what a non-issue this truly is! - would recognize that what's needed is a hybrid version between Haas and Nowak. But in truth, that would mean not very many changes at all - the differences just aren't that great. Bruckner people - what nuts!

Offline waderice

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Re: Maazel/BRSO Bruckner complete symphonies
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2011, 10:53:43 PM »
What rhetoric. The reviewer obviously used this opportunity to air-out his preferences in terms of performing versions, and voicing his opinion on whether the earliest symphonies should be included or not  - a total non-issue if there ever was one. To describe the Haas version of B8 as "pasitiche", and to state that it has been largely "discredited", borders on irresponsible journalism. The differences between Haas and Nowak in B8 are not THAT major, and Haas' work certainly hasn't been discredited by anybody of any real significance. What poppy-cock. Personally, I think that any one who has thoroughly listened to both versions of B8 - and what a non-issue this truly is! - would recognize that what's needed is a hybrid version between Haas and Nowak. But in truth, that would mean not very many changes at all - the differences just aren't that great. Bruckner people - what nuts!

As I said, a nit-picker.  Virtually all listeners wouldn't be able to tell the difference, unless they have a score in front of them, or if there is or is not a cymbal clash at the climax of B7's second movement, for example.

In my collection, I have three Bruckner cycles:  One with Jochum/Staatskapelle Dresden (Nowak) on EMI (which was a great buy on CD) and Haitink/Concertgebouw on Philips and Barenboim/Chicago on DG (Haas), both on LP.  I only have Barenboim/CSO because it is an elusive set that shortly after its complete cycle release, was supplanted by Karajan/Berlin that then-Polygram felt would sell better.  I only regret that Jochum didn't record the Symphony No. 0, but then again, I don't think Nowak or Haas had anything of significance to alter in the score of that work, so no loss there, quite likely.  Maazel might have some worthwhile things to say in his cycle, but I should think I'm satisfied with what I have.

Wade
« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 10:57:11 PM by waderice »

 

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