Author Topic: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle  (Read 534 times)

Offline erikwilson7

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Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« on: April 23, 2019, 02:23:15 PM »
After doing some research on the Düsseldorfer Symphoniker's website I observed that the team at Avi Music tends to release the recording of an Ádám Fischer Mahler symphony approximately 12–14 months after it is performed. This has been a trend for just about every release so far.

What this means is that we should see the Eighth released around September/early autumn of this year, the Ninth in early 2020 with the Second in autumn of 2020, and finally the Sixth in early 2021. No sign of him doing anything with the Tenth, as it appears he is doing a cycle of the "complete" symphonies. It would be nice to see at least the Adagio of the Tenth come at some point.

Another interesting observation is that Iván Fischer began his cycle in 2005 with the Sixth followed by the Second and just (probably) finished with the Seventh, while Ádám Fischer began his cycle with the Seventh and will finish with the Second and ultimately the Sixth. I wonder if the brothers coordinated this, because it's an uncanny coincidence. Pretty astonishing that their Sixths will be about 16 years apart. Time flies.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 07:20:30 PM by erikwilson7 »

Offline erikwilson7

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2019, 06:32:11 PM »

Offline barryguerrero

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2019, 07:50:33 AM »
It's amazing - out of the blue comes Adam Fischer, the Haydn specialist. He seems to be doing this just at the right time in his career, and in the right place as well. I'm really looking forward to that Mahler 8.

I was gung-ho on Thierry Fischer's M8 at first, but not so much now. I don't like the fast tempo for Part II's ending, or the rather brightly lit sound. That said, the soloists and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir are had to beat.

Offline erikwilson7

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2019, 03:01:18 PM »
I gave the Thierry Fischer M8 a listen after all the glowing reviews it got. I was so impressed by the incredible performances of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, the soloists, and the orchestra, but the sound was throwing me off. I was listening on IDAGIO—albeit streaming lossless FLAC quality—but it sounded distant and muddy to me. At the grandest moments I feel like I even heard the mics peaking, and the percussion sounded too distant (being a percussionist myself I’m always listening for that section).

And as you mentioned, I found the ending too fast and the tam-tam/cymbal crashes not overwhelming enough. Can’t beat that Stenz recording.

I’m a little apprehensive about Á. Fischer’s M8 because we haven’t heard him do “grand Mahler” yet, the other being M2. I’m interested to see if Düsseldorf can pull it off. I’m sure he hired great soloists given his choices so far; I’ve loved anything Anna Larsson does ever since her Abbado/Lucerne performances. The only point of choral reference we have is his recent M3, which was a sensational knockout in my books. I’m sure, given his Mahler track record so far, he’ll somehow manage at least a surprisingly well-interpreted M8 with excellent sound.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 03:06:15 PM by erikwilson7 »

Offline barryguerrero

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2019, 06:03:20 PM »
Wow! Several things. It's nice to have a percussionist around. I've been saying all along that Stenz has the best ending to Part II of anybody. It's also pretty darn good on the Jonathan Nott recording - a much 'richer' sounding organ; more spatial depth; good percussion, but also a tad faster than Stenz (I love Stenz's slower tempo). Nott is a bit better at 'smelling the roses along the way' than Stenz is. I like them both. Nott - or somebody in Nott's percussion section - had the foresight to have the cymbals struck just slightly AFTER the tam-tam at the end of Part II. That works.

Second, I do share your thought: we haven't had one of the 'biggies' from Adam Fischer yet. Also, I don't think his cast will be as strong as the one on Thierry Fischer's M8. But it might be another good, 'smelling the roses along the way', type of performance - tall on detail and - perhaps - a bit short on grandiosity. We'll see.

Love your input.

Offline Vehemence

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2019, 12:58:51 PM »
I've been taking in Adam Fischers, 1,3,5 and 7 recently. Trying to play catch up in between binging opera. These are all very fine recordings, with the 3rd being great to my ears. The big thing that comes across to me in all of them is the cohesiveness of the orchestra, their beautifully blended sound, and the ability to sound fresh and spontaneous in these works that have been recorded so much lately.

It's nice that Fischer seems to just present the music with little intervention and let his orchestra and Mahler's music do the talking. Seemingly, the exact opposite of his older brother in a lot of instances.

Offline barryguerrero

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2019, 08:56:14 PM »
 8)

Offline erikwilson7

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2019, 10:30:15 PM »
I've been taking in Adam Fischers, 1,3,5 and 7 recently. Trying to play catch up in between binging opera. These are all very fine recordings, with the 3rd being great to my ears. The big thing that comes across to me in all of them is the cohesiveness of the orchestra, their beautifully blended sound, and the ability to sound fresh and spontaneous in these works that have been recorded so much lately.

It's nice that Fischer seems to just present the music with little intervention and let his orchestra and Mahler's music do the talking. Seemingly, the exact opposite of his older brother in a lot of instances.

That’s something I really admire about this cycle so far. I find the bass end somewhat lacking in the mix (probably due to the concert hall), but it all sounds so smooth and crystal clear. The live aspect really benefits Á. Fischer’s interpretations too, especially in the First and Fifth so far. Everything feels so “in the moment,” essential for the Fifth.

You didn’t mention his M4 but I’d also recommend that one. He doesn’t match the overly expressive, rubato-laden conducting style present in his younger brother’s recording of the Bedächtig, and I feel that Elisabeth Müller’s interpretation of “Das himmlische Leben” doesn’t quite match the sarcastic, playful character of Miah Persson’s, but his executions of the scherzo and Ruhevoll are exceptional.

I’ve already lauded his DLvdE on a separate thread so I won’t get into too many details but that one is also top-notch.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2019, 11:07:10 PM by erikwilson7 »

Offline akiralx

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2019, 12:47:36 AM »
OT, but this month I see Adam Fischer has also released a Beethoven symphony cycle with the Danish Chamber O on Naxos.  Tempi seem fairly rapid.

Offline erikwilson7

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2019, 04:21:35 PM »
OT, but this month I see Adam Fischer has also released a Beethoven symphony cycle with the Danish Chamber O on Naxos.  Tempi seem fairly rapid.

I actually managed to take a listen to the Fifth and Seventh in that cycle as well as some movements from Eroica and the Ninth, and despite Fischer's more rapid pacing I was impressed by the playing of the Danish National Chamber Orchestra, just as I was with their Mozart cycle. It reminded me of how I thought about Fischer's ongoing Mahler cycle: extremely clear detail and expertly conducted. The sound is crisp but dry, lacking a bit in the bass. I don't know if that's Naxos' engineering or a choice on Fischer's part because his Mahler cycle with Avi Music lacks in the bass end a bit too, particularly the Seventh.

There are a bunch of dynamic nuances that Fischer injects to make the music a bit refreshing and I like that. Check out the first movement of Eroica for a prime example: those six "banal" (for 1805) tutti fortissimo chords near the end of the second subject in the exposition are here treated with a crescendo, something I don't think I've ever heard before.

Yes, this is OT, but I would recommend checking out the Fischer/Beethoven cycle because it's a collection of fresh, new takes on this music we know so well.

Offline Prospero

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Re: Update on Ádám Fischer's Mahler Cycle
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2019, 08:29:58 PM »
OT? Adam Fischer Beethoven cycle.
There was an intriguing response from Kate Molleson about this series on BBC 3 Record Review this morning, June 15. She suggested that while obviously conducted with fresh ideas, Fischer encouraged the individuality of the players. She suggested the possibility of an approach that emphasized the communal music making over the great man approach. The excerpt from the 8th was particularly intriguing. Fischer in the booklet called it the most advanced of the symphonies in which Beethoven didn't compose for  the audience .

There is also the economic-political drama where the Danish government defunded the Danish Radio Orchestra. They raised a good deal of money and support to become the Danish Chamber Orchestra. Molleson emphasized the players' commitment  and the deep trust between conductor and orchestra.

 

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