Author Topic: François-Xavier Roth/Les Siècles new recording of “Titan” now available  (Read 238 times)

Offline erikwilson7

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Roth and his period orchestra Les Siècles have released a recording of the Hamburg/Weimar 1893–94 symphonic poem version Titan with Harmonia Mundi. This includes Blumine and a different orchestration than Symphony No. 1 in D Major.

I listened through it on Spotify last night, and it sounded quite good.

I’m hardly familiar with this version of the work so it’s difficult for me to judge the performance other than the orchestra seems to play well. The sonics are somewhat typical of Harmonia Mundi: a lot of detail and clarity but also a great deal of hall acoustical reverb. It reminds me of the Alsop M1 and the Nagano M8 in terms of sound: glossy forward strings and ultra-realistic acoustics, maybe not to the taste of some.

Seems like a solid release, and if anything it’s unique and historical.

Offline Russell

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The hi-res download is on sale (for a limited time) for just $12.55 US at eClassical:

https://www.eclassical.com/harmonia-mundi/mahler-symphony-no-1-in-d-major-1.html

Good deal!!!

Russell

Offline Vehemence

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Downloaded this earlier today. Have not had a chance to listen yet. In the line notes they actually list the instruments used. All turn of the century stuff.

Offline Vehemence

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My time spent with this recording was quite enjoyable. It's very natural sounding, and highly atmospheric; especially Brother John, this may be one of my favorite renditions of that movement on record. The flow, and ease of playing really give a relaxed feeling to the first 4 movements, remember Blumine is included, while the Sturmisch is filled with lots of energy.  I am not a score junky, so all the little differences between this and the newer editions were lost on me. Nothing really slapped me in the face, though. Another listen may reveal more.

Roth's interpretation is nothing revelatory to my ears, it's just a fine recording of the Mahler first. 

 

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