Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10
21
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: Vanska/MO/BIS Mahler 2nd SACD
« Last post by brunumb on November 10, 2018, 06:03:29 PM »
22
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: Vanska/MO/BIS Mahler 2nd SACD
« Last post by John Kim on November 10, 2018, 05:28:11 PM »
timings are

I. 23:17/ II. 9:54/ III. 10:50/ IV. 5:28/ V. 34:08 = 84:38


Looks good.
24
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: Vanska/MO/BIS Mahler 2nd SACD
« Last post by brunumb on November 10, 2018, 03:58:33 PM »
Do you have a link to the site where you saw this?
25
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Vanska/MO/BIS Mahler 2nd SACD
« Last post by John Kim on November 10, 2018, 09:24:29 AM »
I can't upload the pic here (does anyone know how??).

In Japan the release date is 12/31/2018.
26
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: Alma Mahler Study Day - Saturday 3rd November
« Last post by Penny on November 08, 2018, 01:44:01 PM »
I'm pleased to report that our Alma Mahler event with Mary Sharratt on 3rd November was a great success.  To find out more, please click on the link to our Facebook page below: -

https://www.facebook.com/TheGMSUKNM/

Penny
27
"there seems to be a sound world that is slightly more inward than say the full throttled Chicago or Berlin sound"

Genau. Exactly. But the highlights of the piece aren't the slightest bit dull or underplayed either.
28
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: M3 on C-Avi w/ Adam Fischer/Dusseldorf
« Last post by Prospero on November 01, 2018, 02:31:16 PM »
A very beautiful M3. I would note both sonority of the strings and the flexibility of Adam Fischer's conducting that lets the music breathe. He comments in his note to the recording on the difference between the gut strings of Mahler's day and the post-WW1 metal strings of modern orchestras. He notes that playing closer to the finger board brings a softer  tone that can be reminiscent of gut strings. And there seems to be a sound world that is slightly more inward than say the full throttled Chicago or Berlin sound.

Also the voicing of balance of complex passages is very sensitive. Some will have heard that the famous timpani strokes near the end are part of the sound  picture, not dominating-- marked and played "f" ---not "ff" or "fff"

I would also speculate that there is an unusual trust between the orchestra and Fischer.
29
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Re: Walter 1948 NY M2
« Last post by barryguerrero on November 01, 2018, 12:04:10 PM »
I'm sure it's very good. It's a pity, though, that the famous performance Walter gave of M2 in Chicago didn't get preserved.
30
Gustav Mahler and Related Discussions / Walter 1948 NY M2
« Last post by Prospero on November 01, 2018, 06:40:05 AM »
I know most on the list are looking into recent and soon to appear performances. But the occasion historical performance of interest does appear.

The Canadian historical Immortal Performances has recently issued a collection of rare Bruno Walter items. Of note here is a significant 1948 NY Philharmonic M2. Although there are expected sonic limitations, this seems to be Walter’s most completely compelling version of M2. Both more dramatic than you might expect from Walter but also having much sensitive playing from the orchestra. In following the critical score, you can see and hear the close observation of tempo and dynamic nuance and presentation of great detail and naturalness. Also the recording does register a good deal of the instrumental layering of the score. The sonic restoration by Richard Caniell is impressive given the flawed original sources.

The text is in English as was common around WW2 as it is in Walter’s M2 on Music and
Arts from 1942.

Henry Fogel in Fanfare in the recent March/April issue comments on Walter’s Mahler interpretation with admirable balance. He writes that this is “by far Walter’s most dramatic and fiery Mahler Second performance to survive . . . Bruno Walter was, in fact, a man of the theater, and he brings this work to a close in a blaze of glory that clearly ignites an audience ovation at a time when Mahler was still a concert hall rarity. Where Bernstein emphasizes the music’s emotional turmoil, Solti its brilliance, and Haitink its warmth, Walter tries to balance those elements more evenly. Here he succeeds.”

Even with sonic limitations and the English text this is one of the most complete and integrated M2 performances that I have heard.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10